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Don’t Let a Platelet Disorder Affect Your Dental Health

When you get a cut, platelets in your blood form clots to stop the bleeding. However, if you have a platelet disorder, you may not be able to form clots as easily. That means you could be at risk for excessive bleeding.

Individuals with platelet disorders may not brush and floss as regularly as they should because they’re afraid of bleeding. This may be one reason that people with platelet disorders tend to have higher rates of cavities and periodontal (gum) disease than others. However, it’s especially important to keep your teeth and gums healthy if you have a bleeding disorder. Inflamed gum tissue is at increased risk of bleeding. In addition, gum disease may lead to the need to have a tooth pulled. This can be a complicated procedure if you have a platelet disorder.

Tell your dentist if you have a bleeding disorder. Your dentist may want you to take medicine before dental work to minimize bleeding.

“Bleeding Disorders Fact Sheet.” Womenshealth.gov, Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/bleeding-disorders.cfm. Accessed 2013.

“Bleeding Disorders.” Medline Plus, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bleedingdisorders.html. Accessed 2013.

“Bleeding Disorders of Importance in Dental Care and Related Patient Management.” A. Gupta et al. Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, February 2007. Vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 77-83. www.cda-adc.ca/jcda/vol-73/issue-1/77.pdf. Accessed 2013.

“What is von Willebrand Disease?” National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/vwd/. Accessed 2013.

“Platelet Disorders.” Medline Plus, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/plateletdisorders.html. Accessed 2013.

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