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What’s in a Crown? Here’s How Materials Compare

Getting a crown? Find out the benefits behind the different materials available to you, courtesy of the American Dental Association.

 

All-porcelain

Porcelain fused to metal

Gold, copper, and base metal alloys

Durability

Brittle, may fracture under heavy biting loads

Very strong and durable

High corrosion resistance prevents tarnishing; high strength and toughness resist fracture and wear

Resistance to wear

Highly resistant to wear, but can rapidly wear opposing teeth if its surface becomes rough

Resistant to wear and gentle to opposing teeth

Resistance to fracture

Prone to fracture when placed under tension or on impact

Porcelain is prone to impact fracture; metal is strong

Highly resistant to fracture

Sensitivity

Low thermal conductivity reduces likelihood of discomfort from heat and cold

May result in early post-placement discomfort from heat and cold

May result in early post-placement discomfort from heat and cold

Aesthetics

Color and translucency mimic natural tooth appearance

Can mimic natural tooth appearance, but metal limits translucency

Metal colors do not mimic natural teeth.

“Dental Materials: Comparison of Indirect Restorative Dental Materials.” American Dental Association. www.ada.org/3416.aspx Accessed 2013.

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